Wednesday, October 22, 2014

[Yasmin_discussions] Fwd: Don't miss the Robotic Church!

yasminers
well chico's macmurthries borrows on church paraphenalia
as well as the donation box

roger


The Robotic Church is a site-specific installation and performance
series created by Chico MacMurtrie and Amorphic Robot Works. During
this 45-minute performance featuring 42 pneumatic and motorized
automata, MacMurtrie transforms the former Norwegian Seaman's Church
into a potent allegory about the human condition, evolution and
nature.

Ranging in size from 12 inches to 15 feet, these robotic performers
surprise audiences with their percussive sounds and gestures, evoking
the origin of communication through rhythm.

Although responding to both pre-programed and live computer sequences,
MacMurtrie's robots are anthropopathic and organic in nature. With
several new additions from last season, their unique expression
promises to create a visually and acoustically immersive and
viscerally uplifting experience.

The Robotic Church

a site-specific installation and performance

presented by

Chico MacMurtrie / Amorphic Robot Works
in association with FuturePerfect Productions
from October 4th to November 2nd

__________________________________

LAST PERFORMANCES:

Saturday: Oct. 25 & Nov 1 at 3:30 PM and 6:00 PM

Sunday: Oct. 26 & Nov 2 at 3:30 PM and 6:00 PM

Running time approx. 45 min. Space is limited!

Requested Donation: Adults $15, Students $12

Click here to make a reservation

__________________________________


VENUE

Amorphic Robot Works studio

111 Pioneer Street

Brooklyn, NY 11231 (Red Hook)

Click here for MAP

Robotic Church. © Chico MacMurtrie / ARW. Photo: courtesy of Eve Sussman

"MacMurtrie's site-specific sculptures embrace technology and
robotics, and surprise audiences with wholly unusual aesthetic
interventions."

- The Creators Project | click here to read article

"A cacophony of drumming, thumping, chiming, metallic thuds and atonal
string notes, accompanied by the hisses of the pneumatic rams that
operate many of the robots' body parts, creating the show's complex
sonic texture."

- New York Times | click here to read article

Follow this link to watch Artinfo's video feature of
The Robotic Church


Robotic Church. © Chico MacMurtrie / ARW. Photo: courtesy of Ed Newman

The Robotic Church is a site-specific installation and performance
series created by Chico MacMurtrie and Amorphic Robot Works. During
this 45-minute performance featuring 42 pneumatic and motorized
automata, MacMurtrie transforms the former Norwegian Seaman's Church
into a potent allegory about the human condition, evolution and
nature.

Ranging in size from 12 inches to 15 feet, these robotic performers
surprise audiences with their percussive sounds and gestures, evoking
the origin of communication through rhythm.

Although responding to both pre-programed and live computer sequences,
MacMurtrie's robots are anthropopathic and organic in nature. With
several new additions from last season, their unique expression
promises to create a visually and acoustically immersive and
viscerally uplifting experience.


Robotic Church. © Chico MacMurtrie / ARW. Photo: courtesy of Robert Wright


The Robotic Church relies only upon its own resources and your
donations. Our requested donation of $15.00 or more per attendee
covers less than one-third of the cost of the performances that we
offer. Your generous support helps to make up the rest. Please support
The Robotic Church and help us to continue presenting this unique
performance series to New York audiences.

Thank you in advance for your patronage of The Robotic Church!


About Chico MacMurtrie / ARW

Chico MacMurtrie is the Artistic Director of Amorphic Robot Works
(ARW), a collective he founded in 1991, consisting of artists,
technicians and engineers. ARW is dedicated to the study and creation
of movement as it is expressed in anthropomorphic and abstract robotic
forms.

MacMurtrie's robotic sculptures have been exhibited in major museums
and institutions worldwide, including: Museo de la Reina Sofia, Madrid
(2008), NAMOC, Beijing (2008), MUAC, Mexico City (2009), Beall Center
for Art and Technology, Irvine, CA (2011), 9th Shanghai Biennial
(2012), Pioneer Works, New York (2013/2014), SESC SP, Sao Paulo,
Brazil (2014), The New Media Triennial, NAMOC, Beijing (2014), Cité
des Sciences, Paris (2014-2015).

www.amorphicrobotworks.org


About FuturePerfect Productions

FuturePerfect is a New York-based interdisciplinary production company
focused on the intersection of live performance, media, visual art and
technology. Wayne Ashley, the former Director of Arts in Multimedia at
Brooklyn Academy of Music (BAM), founded the company in 2008.
FuturePerfect develops works through close and often long-term
relationships with some of today's most interesting artists,
scientists, researchers and organizations. Through ongoing
collaborations FuturePerfect generates and supports new directions in
performance and visual culture through commissions, touring,
consulting, residencies, presentations, and conferences.

www.futureperfectproductions.org

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Tuesday, October 21, 2014

Re: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Dear Stephen,

The problem is that few critics know anything about the history of science, little about the deep history of art, and nothing about the sociology of knowledge in its historical frame. As a result, they are not aware that art and science have been on close terms at many times in history, though not at all times.

Your point is well taken about Pollock, Greenberg, and Rosenberg. There is even more to that — it suited the United States government to promote abstract expressionism as part of the cultural initiatives of the early post-war era. America massive budgetary resources available for any purpose that would project global leadership. This is the kind of thing that would today be called "soft power." If you read Greenberg's prose of the time, he was essentially claiming that New York had replaced Paris as the global centre for advanced art. While we couldn't directly disrespect our French allies, we could claim to surpass them, and this was one way to do it while pleasing the British at the same time.

It's an historical footnote, but Churchill's quip about Charles de Gaulle said it all: "Of all the crosses I must bear, the Cross Lorraine is the hardest." France gets on with Germany in the way that only former enemies can, but it has been said that the descendants of Napoleon never forgave the Yanks or the Brits for helping them to emerge as the victors of two wars. In this context, Greenberg's essays on French art and the School of Paris irked the French while pleasing those who wished to demonstrate that the United States was the new global superpower. As contrasted, of course, with a superpower whose name will not be mentioned here, but whose artists had neither a Clement Greenberg to sing their praises nor the funding for global exhibitions.

Alas, it suits no one to sing the praises of art-science. For that matter, relatively few people even care about the history of science — the point of science is that it builds on its own foundations by progressive improvements that render the past obsolete. The 18th century origins of computation theory or the principles of Newtonian optics interest relatively few. So it is with the rich history of the relations between art and science. But nano-technology and genetic therapy have a practical value that keeps them in the news, while we do relatively little with cash value in a world that values art that does well at auction.

In an art world driven by the wealthy collectors who also serve as museum patrons and the art dealers who supply their goods, the possibility that art-science matters for the right reasons is almost a guarantee that art critics will not take us seriously.

Yours,

Ken

Ken Friedman, PhD, DSc (hc), FDRS | Editor-in-Chief | 设计 She Ji. The Journal of Design, Economics, and Innovation | Published by Elsevier in Cooperation with Tongji University Press | Launching in 2015

Chair Professor of Design Innovation Studies | College of Design and Innovation | Tongji University | Shanghai, China ||| University Distinguished Professor | Centre for Design Innovation | Swinburne University of Technology


On 2014Oct22, at 07:04, Stephen Nowlin <stephen.nowlin@artcenter.edu> wrote:

>
> Thoughtful point, Joe. Quick, rambling response, here . . .
>
> Regarding reaching general audiences, I guess, well, it takes a village -- i.e., Jackson Pollock needed the help he got from Harold Rosenberg and Clement Greenberg. And Pollock's in-your-face radicalism didn't hurt either. Art itself has only a fleeting hold on the meanings an artist intends -- those meanings don't get forged into broad cultural existence until taken up and expanded upon by others. And it doesn't happen overnight. In my experience curating a couple decades of art-science exhibitions, I've found it a major challenge to get critics and writers to take the genre (if it's that) seriously. Mostly, when they do write about it, they target its novelty -- the pairing of strange bedfellows, these two domains from stereotypically opposite ends of a spectrum. That's about as deep as it goes -- the reviews are happy, upbeat, sometimes informative, surface-scratching. I think -- embedded within the art-science enterprise is a pretty radical idea, still: the supernatural is unnecessary to the enterprise of a meaningful existence. But if you want art to spread meaning, you can't rely on art to do the spreading. It's a problem for art-science -- despite burgeoning participation among artists and academics, for the public it doesn't really exist -- or if it does, it doesn't yet challenge or offend them, doesn't have an edge. It's still too pretty . . .
>
> /stephen


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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Thoughtful point, Joe. Quick, rambling response, here . . .

Regarding reaching general audiences, I guess, well, it takes a village -- i.e., Jackson Pollock needed the help he got from Harold Rosenberg and Clement Greenberg. And Pollock's in-your-face radicalism didn't hurt either. Art itself has only a fleeting hold on the meanings an artist intends -- those meanings don't get forged into broad cultural existence until taken up and expanded upon by others. And it doesn't happen overnight. In my experience curating a couple decades of art-science exhibitions, I've found it a major challenge to get critics and writers to take the genre (if it's that) seriously. Mostly, when they do write about it, they target its novelty -- the pairing of strange bedfellows, these two domains from stereotypically opposite ends of a spectrum. That's about as deep as it goes -- the reviews are happy, upbeat, sometimes informative, surface-scratching. I think -- embedded within the art-science enterprise is a pretty radical idea, still: the supernatural is unnecessary to the enterprise of a meaningful existence. But if you want art to spread meaning, you can't rely on art to do the spreading. It's a problem for art-science -- despite burgeoning participation among artists and academics, for the public it doesn't really exist -- or if it does, it doesn't yet challenge or offend them, doesn't have an edge. It's still too pretty . . .

/stephen
________________________________________
From: yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr [yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr] On Behalf Of Klein, Joseph [Joseph.Klein@unt.edu]
Sent: Tuesday, October 21, 2014 11:42 AM
To: YASMIN DISCUSSIONS
Subject: Re: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Stephen's post from Sunday got me thinking about my frustration at what I perceive to be art's ineffectiveness at proselytizing when it comes to rejecting (or even questioning) the supernatural. On the contrary, I'm afraid that art often reinforces the bankrupt notion of Intelligent Design by the mere fact that it involves a creator—this is the false equivalency that ID advocates use as "proof" of a divine source for all natural phenomena. If I as an artist find beauty in a natural process or an elegant mathematical equation, and use this as the source of my artwork, I have played right into the hand of the religionist who argues that---like God---I have consciously guided these processes to create something meaningful. Stephen's most recent post linking pictorial/illusionist space in art to imaginary/supernatural space in science is intriguing as well; but I wonder how realistic it is to expect a general audience---presumably, one that is largely under the sway of supernatural beliefs---to pick up on such esoteric and subtle concepts. For these reasons, I am skeptical of art-science's ability to effectively make this case, at least on a large scale.

Joe

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Joseph Klein, DMus
Distinguished Teaching Professor
Chair, Division of Composition Studies
University of North Texas College of Music
1155 Union Circle #311367
Denton, TX 76203-5017
(940)565-4926 (ph); (940)565-2002 (fax)
Joseph.Klein@unt.edu
http://www.music.unt.edu/comp/josephklein

________________________________________
From: yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr <yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr> on behalf of Stephen Nowlin <stephen.nowlin@artcenter.edu>
Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 1:51 PM
To: yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
Subject: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Yesterday on National Public Radio I heard talk of an atheist church movement called Sunday Assembly — a gathering to share fellowship in the spirit of humanitarian existence, to hep the disadvantaged, to welcome all types. It sounded a lot like conventional church, but refreshingly sans-supernatural. But what of the social reality that provides such an enterprise its uniqueness? What of the immense body of institutions on the other side of the equation, that embody and perpetuate the supernatural as the guiding force of the cosmos?

In a forum like Yasmin it makes sense to approach the subject under discussion from an academic and philosophical prospective, to speak of the supernatural in terms of the limits of science and the knowable. In those terms the postings have been welcomed, thoughtful and productive. But my struggle is that a debate over the limits of science, the theories and principles of indeterminacy, etc., will likely never reach the vast swaths of population whose existence is defined by a much more prosaic notion of the supernatural. For that majority, the supernatural is conceived as intervening surreptitiously and constantly, undetected by science and with an agenda, in all the minute affairs of the material and immaterial. The specifics of that intervention include virtually all causality throughout the universe and miraculous daily contradictions with known science, as well as the magical micro-management of the intellectual processes and emotional sensations of every living one of a particular primate species on planet Earth — and to that majority, this all makes perfect sense. This concept of the supernatural lacks only the belief in a geocentric solar system to distinguish it from virtually the same majority beliefs of a millennia ago. It is stunning.

Science is not very good at proselytizing — and can be forgiven, since that's not its bailiwick. In fact science is really very bad at it, and perhaps shudders some at its insiders who have broken through — the Sam Harris's and Richard Dawkin's. But proselytizing, in its laundered, metaphorical way, IS the bailiwick of art. And now art, in a rather remarkable spontaneous combustion over the last several years, has gone public in its partnership with science.

There was a time, not too long ago really, when art had a much cozier-than-now relationship with religion, and it was through art that the supernatural was provided a convincing appearance — a veracity in pictorial space that bled into real space and persuaded generation after generation that the cosmos was indeed administered by magic. Now art pairs with science, and so other than the novelty of these two seemingly disparate domains coming together, and the production of pretty lab pictures, I wonder what art-science can do that is original in order to, as it were, atone for its history of helping spread the meme of a universe saturated in the supernatural? What can art-science do to more proactively include in its inventory of critical meanings the awareness of a reality that is both sublime and non-supernatural, that will reach that massive audience in a way that science, by itself, cannot? In a hundred-fifty year lineage of moments when art has mattered paradigmatically, why or how will art-science matter?

/stephen




Stephen Nowlin
Vice President
Director, Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery
Art Center College of Design
1700 Lida Street
Pasadena, CA 91103
http://williamsongallery.net/google

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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Stephen's post from Sunday got me thinking about my frustration at what I perceive to be art's ineffectiveness at proselytizing when it comes to rejecting (or even questioning) the supernatural. On the contrary, I'm afraid that art often reinforces the bankrupt notion of Intelligent Design by the mere fact that it involves a creator—this is the false equivalency that ID advocates use as "proof" of a divine source for all natural phenomena. If I as an artist find beauty in a natural process or an elegant mathematical equation, and use this as the source of my artwork, I have played right into the hand of the religionist who argues that---like God---I have consciously guided these processes to create something meaningful. Stephen's most recent post linking pictorial/illusionist space in art to imaginary/supernatural space in science is intriguing as well; but I wonder how realistic it is to expect a general audience---presumably, one that is largely under the sway of supernatural beliefs---to pick up on such esoteric and subtle concepts. For these reasons, I am skeptical of art-science's ability to effectively make this case, at least on a large scale.

Joe

–––––––––––––––––––––––––––
Joseph Klein, DMus
Distinguished Teaching Professor
Chair, Division of Composition Studies
University of North Texas College of Music
1155 Union Circle #311367
Denton, TX 76203-5017
(940)565-4926 (ph); (940)565-2002 (fax)
Joseph.Klein@unt.edu
http://www.music.unt.edu/comp/josephklein

________________________________________
From: yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr <yasmin_discussions-bounces@estia.media.uoa.gr> on behalf of Stephen Nowlin <stephen.nowlin@artcenter.edu>
Sent: Sunday, October 19, 2014 1:51 PM
To: yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
Subject: [Yasmin_discussions] Why does art-science matter?

Yesterday on National Public Radio I heard talk of an atheist church movement called Sunday Assembly — a gathering to share fellowship in the spirit of humanitarian existence, to hep the disadvantaged, to welcome all types. It sounded a lot like conventional church, but refreshingly sans-supernatural. But what of the social reality that provides such an enterprise its uniqueness? What of the immense body of institutions on the other side of the equation, that embody and perpetuate the supernatural as the guiding force of the cosmos?

In a forum like Yasmin it makes sense to approach the subject under discussion from an academic and philosophical prospective, to speak of the supernatural in terms of the limits of science and the knowable. In those terms the postings have been welcomed, thoughtful and productive. But my struggle is that a debate over the limits of science, the theories and principles of indeterminacy, etc., will likely never reach the vast swaths of population whose existence is defined by a much more prosaic notion of the supernatural. For that majority, the supernatural is conceived as intervening surreptitiously and constantly, undetected by science and with an agenda, in all the minute affairs of the material and immaterial. The specifics of that intervention include virtually all causality throughout the universe and miraculous daily contradictions with known science, as well as the magical micro-management of the intellectual processes and emotional sensations of every living one of a particular primate species on planet Earth — and to that majority, this all makes perfect sense. This concept of the supernatural lacks only the belief in a geocentric solar system to distinguish it from virtually the same majority beliefs of a millennia ago. It is stunning.

Science is not very good at proselytizing — and can be forgiven, since that's not its bailiwick. In fact science is really very bad at it, and perhaps shudders some at its insiders who have broken through — the Sam Harris's and Richard Dawkin's. But proselytizing, in its laundered, metaphorical way, IS the bailiwick of art. And now art, in a rather remarkable spontaneous combustion over the last several years, has gone public in its partnership with science.

There was a time, not too long ago really, when art had a much cozier-than-now relationship with religion, and it was through art that the supernatural was provided a convincing appearance — a veracity in pictorial space that bled into real space and persuaded generation after generation that the cosmos was indeed administered by magic. Now art pairs with science, and so other than the novelty of these two seemingly disparate domains coming together, and the production of pretty lab pictures, I wonder what art-science can do that is original in order to, as it were, atone for its history of helping spread the meme of a universe saturated in the supernatural? What can art-science do to more proactively include in its inventory of critical meanings the awareness of a reality that is both sublime and non-supernatural, that will reach that massive audience in a way that science, by itself, cannot? In a hundred-fifty year lineage of moments when art has mattered paradigmatically, why or how will art-science matter?

/stephen




Stephen Nowlin
Vice President
Director, Alyce de Roulet Williamson Gallery
Art Center College of Design
1700 Lida Street
Pasadena, CA 91103
http://williamsongallery.net/google

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[Yasmin_discussions] your yasmin moderator this week

Dear Yasminers

I am your moderator this week -from Madrid
Spain= where i am visiting YASMIN moderator
Monica Bello= and serving on the VIDA art
and artificial life competition jury- if you are in
madrid and have time for coffee - email me !!

Our discussion about the supernatural in art and science
on the discussion list is going great- we encourage
all you lurkers to post on this interesting discussion
that is below the surface of our art-sci-tech community of
practice !

if you have any trouble with the mechanics of the yasmin
lists ( sometimes i wonder if the internet is noxious to
good communication !) contact me

Roger Malina
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[Yasmin_discussions] Fwd: joining voices

Two quick points in response to your post, Stephen: One, what I'm most
interested in here is how art-science can pro-actively accelerate the
"slow-growing seedlings of doubt," the "slow decline of confidence in a
concept of the supernatural." Two, in response to your comment that
"metaphorically, pictorial and illusionistic space is to the painted
object, as imaginary and supernatural space is to science.... The
collaboration between art and science is a direct descendent of those
earlier artistic movements and scientific discoveries that faced away from
the window of illusion and unshackled the notion that what is real is
vastly more intricate in its emotional abundance, than what is not..."
Works of art such as those in REALSPACE (as far as I can tell from the
website), and others that take some real-world phenomenon of physical
nature and play with it, transpose it, underline it, or as Dissanyake would
describe, "make special," may be one of the most successful approaches for
the challenge described above. A few other works that come to mind in this
category are Natalie Miebach's work translating meteorological and
oceanographic data into musical compositions or woven basket sculptures,
Jeff Talman's "Nature of the Night Sky," Ned Kahn's works that translate
wind into visual patterns using arrays of thin, hinged metal scales, and of
course the work of the Wertheims and their many collaborators using crochet
to describe hyperbolic forms.

--

*Nancy Lowe*

*Director, Symbiosis Art + Science Alliance*

*http://symbiosisartscience.org <http://symbiosisartscience.org>*
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Monday, October 20, 2014

Re: [Yasmin_discussions] joining voices

Nancy -- I was intrigued by this reference in your most recent post:

"I'm thinking about Daniel Kahnemann's Thinking Fast and Slow and the fallacy of availability - we believe what we hear over and over, whether it's true or not..."

and would add a slightly different but supportive notion from the visual arts to Kahnemann's idea of repetition as a 'fallacy of availability.'

In his book "The Paradoxes of Art: a Phenomenological Investigation" (2004), Alan Paskow writes that "When we view a painting, we posit both the essence and actual existence of a depiction as truly real." . . . "The distinction between ... what is 'merely fictional' and what is 'actually real,' are not so sharp as virtually all Western philosophers have unquestioningly assumed..."

What Paskow is saying throughout his articulate and well-defended book, is that the creation of realistic looking things, people, landscapes, etc. in the illusionistic pictorial space of painting provides those depictions and whatever themes they engage, no matter how fantastic, with a sense of being real that is largely indistinguishable from our sense of actual, non-imaginary reality. Applied to the long history of art and religion, one can imagine -- particularly before science planted its slow-growing seedlings of doubt -- that the form and substance provided by painting to ancient narratives of the supernatural, giving them appearances, has served to convince onlookers of their true reality.

This insight of Paskow's has resonance with the advent of modern art in the mid nineteenth-century, and as well with its linkages to the current art-science movement. In nineteenth-century art the notion that true reality could be envisioned by an imitation of appearances came under attack. This implied a tacit rejection not only of former structures of painting's pictorial space but also, more importantly, of former ways of understanding the world that painting had empowered.

Metaphorically, pictorial and illusionistic space is to the painted object, as imaginary and supernatural space is to science. After Cezanne, an erosion of illusion in painting accelerated, and a movement toward the concrete in painting -- painting as a real object rather than an illusionary window -- can be interpreted as having symbolized a decline of confidence in the imaginary (e.g., supernatural) brought about by dramatic advancements in science during the same period. This deconstruction and rearrangement of pictorial space took on various forms and degrees of deviation from past artistic orthodoxies, but the overarching intent was clear: to construct a new way of picturing the world that was based in the epistemologies of real space. The collaboration between art and science is a direct descendent of those earlier artistic movements and scientific discoveries that faced away from the window of illusion and unshackled the notion that what is real is vastly more intricate in its emotional abundance, than what is not.

Two weeks ago the Williamson Gallery at Art Center College opened an exhibition called REALSPACE, in which this theme is explored further ( http://williamsongallery.net/realspace ). I was pleased to find resonance with its premise in Nancy's post, and wonder what others might think about this idea of a longer historical relation between modern art and a slow decline of confidence in a concept of the supernatural.

/stephen
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