Monday, May 22, 2017

Re: [Yasmin_discussions] art*science 2017 - The New and History

Hi all,
I am enjoying this discussion a lot and I have several questions
On the question of raw data/objective data raised by Živa and Katerina. this is a thorny issue and, as Živa says, it is difficult to turn impartiality on and off. Craig Dalton and Jim Thatcher have written extensively about this issue. They explain that data can't be neutral, or objective because they "are necessarily situated and partial". According to Turnbull, data only make sense when they are examined in their context. By relying exclusively on quantity and quantification we create a gap between the information collected and its context resulting in a progressive loss of connection, as context becomes superfluous and all the attention becomes focused on data conceived as "pure" and impartial. I am particularly interested in the situatedness of data, as it is very relevant to the question of cultural heritage. here my question/curiosity is: if there is no such thing as impartial and raw data, then would a series of partial, smaller scale, yet very much situated experiments in cultural (emotional, historical, local) cartography seize the spirit of a place's cultural heritage? here I am using "spirit" because I am not sure that focusing on a specific, discrete item would give me a sense of its complexity and its dynamic essence.

a few questions to Salvatore and Oriana (but also to anybody who wants to add to it) related to cultural heritage and archiving, stemming from issues that I have encountered in my own projects. So you establish many alliances and discover many (possible and already existing but imperceptible to you until now) interdisciplinary intersections, layers of narratives etc.. how do you record them and map them? In Suely Rolnik's words, the ideal archive should be able to "..activate sensible experiences in the present, different from those that were originally lived, but nonetheless with an equivalent critical-poetic density." But how? when technologies are not able to do this, what other techniques do we have to reproduce such richness and its affective value - I could perceive from your words an enthusiasm that reminded me so much of my own experience, which then was also accompanied by a bit of frustration when I discovered that I was having a hard time to communicate it to others.

Finally, to respond to Ken. As far as I understand, the conversation so far has been about cultural heritage and its power relations, hierarchies and difficult choices, so when Salvatore says :
"A sincere alliance between arts, sciences and technologies would seem a
great, positive solution to this kind of question. Going beyond current
approaches towards arts and science collaborations and promoting art as a
platform to get sciences out of laboratories and into crowded, narrow
streets"
I don't interpret it as a general and literal: "let's get scientists out of the labs", but an invitation towards a more interdisciplinary, relational and, why not? Humane approach to a variety of issues. This is not an invitation to change practice. It doesn't mean for the scientist to exit the lab and start doing the job of the sociologist, or open the lab to contamination, public interventions etc… or not rely on their tools of trade, but an invitation to practice a form of awareness that science is not made in a silo, but has a context around it, and this context is also made of the people it affects and/or benefits from.
In the context of cultural heritage, I value this approach, because this potential opening can help us understand, preserve and enhance many aspects of a city, a territory or a social domain that we could not seize without the help of the scientific perspective. In this sense, many artists have already exited the lab: at the march for science in Toronto, just to give an example, keynote speakers included, among others, a climate change scientist, a science librarian, a social scientist working on science and human rights, a feminist scientist, an indigenous science advocate and a water protector.

…and speaking of cultural heritage and power, today in canada is an odd day: we "celebrate" Queen Victoria's birthday, whatever that means ….

Roberta

> On May 21, 2017, at 11:03, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> Katerina,
>
> certainly, the concept of innovation is the religion of today's economy.
> Economy is a tricky game. When faced with red numbers and limited resources
> – we tricked ourselves into borrowing from the future. We promised
> unprecedented abundance to repay our debts sometime later and for the
> equations of economy to hold, we must eventually deliver something,
> something "else," something "new." Of course the game is too complex to
> just stop it. But perhaps there are other tricks to get us out of trouble.
> What you propose is very interesting and very close to what I had in mind
> when mentioning interdependency between heritage and innovation. As you
> cleverly noticed it is renovation of ideas rather than innovation that
> technological progress provides. The question is thus: can bringing the
> terms innovation and heritage closer together do the trick?
>
> As goes with innovation, culture is just as over-used and abused term, and
> a dangerous game to play on top of playing economy. A well-established
> cultural heritage of one people, for instance, includes the rules of
> control and domination over another people that managed to overshadow,
> overtake and erase cultural heritage of others. Is human intelligence
> mature enough to face the "cultural issues" or should we ask artificial
> intelligence? Again, as you noticed, we cannot simply switch on the button
> of impartiality. The "raw data" is hard to excavate but perhaps the
> abundance of "big data" might do the trick approximately. Do we have
> another choice?
>
> Živa Ljubec
>
>
> On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Katreina Karoussos <kkaroussos@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Ziva,
>>
>> Impartial digital neural sets is actually an excellent way of dealing with
>> cultural assets.
>> In this manner we are taking culture as an animated organism. To be
>> animated though we shall look at its appetite, that is, the primary force
>> of its dynamics. In any other case, i think that the neural sets will still
>> behave in the common hierarchical organizational structure.
>> I don't think that we should take it as "raw data" because the appetite is
>> something inherent to us and all of the data are available to us evenly,
>> the important thing is what we are choosing to project.
>>
>> Katerina Karoussos
>>
>>> On 18 May 2017, at 23:05, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Katerina,
>>>
>>>
>>> indeed, a critical stance towards historical and geographical approaches
>> to
>>> cultural heritage is always valuable. Both tangible and intangible
>> heritage
>>> has been, as you point out, processed in different ways for different
>>> political and economic motives and no mode of preservation and
>> presentation
>>> of the heritage can be taken for granted. Precisely for this reason I
>> think
>>> a hypothetical discussion of moving from unavoidably prejudiced human
>>> neural nets to hypothetically impartial digital neural nets might be in
>>> place. With almost unlimited computational resources, what would
>> computers
>>> make out of it all? To what degree can we restrain the human bias is, as
>>> you have noticed, an important issue to consider. Even defining the area
>>> can be troublesome, let alone the artefacts. The naturally given concept
>> of
>>> Mediterranean rim, the shores of the basin filled with Mediterranean sea,
>>> might start changing with changes in the global climate – which
>> coordinates
>>> are included and which excluded? Cultural concepts as well go naturally
>>> with their context and converting them into a digital form does not
>>> encompass the complete picture in "high definition." If we were to feed
>> the
>>> model with the "raw" data – what would constitute "raw" at this very
>>> moment? The heritage that was already digitized and uploaded from all
>>> possible sources or the analogue data from carefully selected
>> institutional
>>> sources? Running the model for a week, a month, a year, …, its data set
>>> constantly increasing, its neurons ceaselessly forming new connections,
>>> would it provide us with clues that we could relate to or with
>> alternative
>>> views, alien viewpoints of culture we considered familiar.
>>>
>>>
>>> Ziva Ljubec
>>>
>>> On Tue, May 16, 2017 at 5:40 PM, Pier Luigi Capucci <plc@noemalab.org>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Dear all,
>>>>
>>>> among the Yasmin invited respondents to the art*science Leonardo 50
>>>> discussion there is also Elena Giulia Rossi. Many thanks to Elena Giulia
>>>> for joining us!
>>>>
>>>> Elena Giulia Rossi - rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com <mailto:
>>>> rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com> (Italy)
>>>> Elena Giulia Rossi lives and works in Rome. Her research and experience
>>>> have been addressing contemporary art and its relation with technology.
>>>> Oscillating between tradition and modernity, and under a
>>>> socio-anthropological perspective. With a degree in History of Art from
>> the
>>>> University of Roma La Sapienza (1999), she gained a MA in Arts
>>>> Administration from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago (2002).
>> She
>>>> has been collaborating with different galleries and institutions in
>> Italy
>>>> and abroad, such as the MAXXI Museum (Rome, 2003-2012), P.S.1
>> Contemporary
>>>> Art Center (New York 2001); The Renaissance Society at The University of
>>>> Chicago (2002); the Joan Flasch Artists' Book Collection at The School
>> of
>>>> The Art Institute of Chicago (2002), and Studio Stefania Miscetti (Rome
>>>> 2004-2005). She has been writing regularly for catalogues and magazines.
>>>> She is the author of Archeonet (Lalli: Siena, 2003), and the editor of
>>>> Eduardo Kac: Move 36 (Filigranes Éditions: Paris, 2005). She currently
>>>> teaches Net Art and Theory of Multimedia Art at the Accademia di Belle
>> Arti
>>>> in Rome and she is founder and editorial director of the
>> multidisciplinary
>>>> platform Arshake (www.arshake).
>>>>
>>>> Thank you in advance,
>>>>
>>>> Pier Luigi
>>>> --
>>>> Pier Luigi Capucci
>>>> via Rovigo, 8
>>>> 48016 Milano Marittima (RA)
>>>> ITALY
>>>> Tel.: +39 (0) 544 976156
>>>> Mobile: +39 348 3889844
>>>> e-mail: plc@noemalab.org
>>>> web: http://capucci.org
>>>> skype: plcapucci
>>>>
>>>> _______________________________________________
>>>> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
>>>> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
>>>> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
>>>>
>>>> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
>>>>
>>>> SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In the
>>>> page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
>>>> password in the fields found further down the page.
>>>> HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE: on the info page, scroll all the way down and enter
>>>> your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on
>>>> the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
>>>> TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set
>> Digest
>>>> Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
>>>> If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
>>>> http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
>>> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
>>> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
>>>
>>> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
>>>
>>> SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In the
>> page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
>> password in the fields found further down the page.
>>> HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE: on the info page, scroll all the way down and enter
>> your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on
>> the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
>>> TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set
>> Digest Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
>>> If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
>> http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
>> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
>> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
>>
>> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
>>
>> SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In the
>> page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
>> password in the fields found further down the page.
>> HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE: on the info page, scroll all the way down and enter
>> your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on
>> the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
>> TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set Digest
>> Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
>> If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
>> http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
>>
> _______________________________________________
> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
>
> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
>
> SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In the page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and password in the fields found further down the page.
> HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE: on the info page, scroll all the way down and enter your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
> TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set Digest Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
> If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
_______________________________________________
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Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
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Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin

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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] art*science 2017 - The New and History

Hello everyone,
I am in Corfu with Katerina where our internet access is somewhat sporadic.
So, if you do not hear back from us, please do not hold it against us. We
will try to follow the discussion and try to contribute whenever possible.

I will be back home on June 1st. Soi hopefully after that I will be around
much more, as will Katerina when she gets back home on the 30th.

much love from Corfu

Elif

On Sun, May 21, 2017 at 8:03 AM, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:

> Katerina,
>
> certainly, the concept of innovation is the religion of today's economy.
> Economy is a tricky game. When faced with red numbers and limited resources
> – we tricked ourselves into borrowing from the future. We promised
> unprecedented abundance to repay our debts sometime later and for the
> equations of economy to hold, we must eventually deliver something,
> something "else," something "new." Of course the game is too complex to
> just stop it. But perhaps there are other tricks to get us out of trouble.
> What you propose is very interesting and very close to what I had in mind
> when mentioning interdependency between heritage and innovation. As you
> cleverly noticed it is renovation of ideas rather than innovation that
> technological progress provides. The question is thus: can bringing the
> terms innovation and heritage closer together do the trick?
>
> As goes with innovation, culture is just as over-used and abused term, and
> a dangerous game to play on top of playing economy. A well-established
> cultural heritage of one people, for instance, includes the rules of
> control and domination over another people that managed to overshadow,
> overtake and erase cultural heritage of others. Is human intelligence
> mature enough to face the "cultural issues" or should we ask artificial
> intelligence? Again, as you noticed, we cannot simply switch on the button
> of impartiality. The "raw data" is hard to excavate but perhaps the
> abundance of "big data" might do the trick approximately. Do we have
> another choice?
>
> Živa Ljubec
>
>
> On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Katreina Karoussos <kkaroussos@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> > Ziva,
> >
> > Impartial digital neural sets is actually an excellent way of dealing
> with
> > cultural assets.
> > In this manner we are taking culture as an animated organism. To be
> > animated though we shall look at its appetite, that is, the primary force
> > of its dynamics. In any other case, i think that the neural sets will
> still
> > behave in the common hierarchical organizational structure.
> > I don't think that we should take it as "raw data" because the appetite
> is
> > something inherent to us and all of the data are available to us evenly,
> > the important thing is what we are choosing to project.
> >
> > Katerina Karoussos
> >
> > > On 18 May 2017, at 23:05, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > Katerina,
> > >
> > >
> > > indeed, a critical stance towards historical and geographical
> approaches
> > to
> > > cultural heritage is always valuable. Both tangible and intangible
> > heritage
> > > has been, as you point out, processed in different ways for different
> > > political and economic motives and no mode of preservation and
> > presentation
> > > of the heritage can be taken for granted. Precisely for this reason I
> > think
> > > a hypothetical discussion of moving from unavoidably prejudiced human
> > > neural nets to hypothetically impartial digital neural nets might be in
> > > place. With almost unlimited computational resources, what would
> > computers
> > > make out of it all? To what degree can we restrain the human bias is,
> as
> > > you have noticed, an important issue to consider. Even defining the
> area
> > > can be troublesome, let alone the artefacts. The naturally given
> concept
> > of
> > > Mediterranean rim, the shores of the basin filled with Mediterranean
> sea,
> > > might start changing with changes in the global climate – which
> > coordinates
> > > are included and which excluded? Cultural concepts as well go naturally
> > > with their context and converting them into a digital form does not
> > > encompass the complete picture in "high definition." If we were to feed
> > the
> > > model with the "raw" data – what would constitute "raw" at this very
> > > moment? The heritage that was already digitized and uploaded from all
> > > possible sources or the analogue data from carefully selected
> > institutional
> > > sources? Running the model for a week, a month, a year, …, its data set
> > > constantly increasing, its neurons ceaselessly forming new connections,
> > > would it provide us with clues that we could relate to or with
> > alternative
> > > views, alien viewpoints of culture we considered familiar.
> > >
> > >
> > > Ziva Ljubec
> > >
> > > On Tue, May 16, 2017 at 5:40 PM, Pier Luigi Capucci <plc@noemalab.org>
> > > wrote:
> > >
> > >> Dear all,
> > >>
> > >> among the Yasmin invited respondents to the art*science Leonardo 50
> > >> discussion there is also Elena Giulia Rossi. Many thanks to Elena
> Giulia
> > >> for joining us!
> > >>
> > >> Elena Giulia Rossi - rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com <mailto:
> > >> rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com> (Italy)
> > >> Elena Giulia Rossi lives and works in Rome. Her research and
> experience
> > >> have been addressing contemporary art and its relation with
> technology.
> > >> Oscillating between tradition and modernity, and under a
> > >> socio-anthropological perspective. With a degree in History of Art
> from
> > the
> > >> University of Roma La Sapienza (1999), she gained a MA in Arts
> > >> Administration from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago (2002).
> > She
> > >> has been collaborating with different galleries and institutions in
> > Italy
> > >> and abroad, such as the MAXXI Museum (Rome, 2003-2012), P.S.1
> > Contemporary
> > >> Art Center (New York 2001); The Renaissance Society at The University
> of
> > >> Chicago (2002); the Joan Flasch Artists' Book Collection at The School
> > of
> > >> The Art Institute of Chicago (2002), and Studio Stefania Miscetti
> (Rome
> > >> 2004-2005). She has been writing regularly for catalogues and
> magazines.
> > >> She is the author of Archeonet (Lalli: Siena, 2003), and the editor of
> > >> Eduardo Kac: Move 36 (Filigranes Éditions: Paris, 2005). She currently
> > >> teaches Net Art and Theory of Multimedia Art at the Accademia di Belle
> > Arti
> > >> in Rome and she is founder and editorial director of the
> > multidisciplinary
> > >> platform Arshake (www.arshake).
> > >>
> > >> Thank you in advance,
> > >>
> > >> Pier Luigi
> > >> --
> > >> Pier Luigi Capucci
> > >> via Rovigo, 8
> > >> 48016 Milano Marittima (RA)
> > >> ITALY
> > >> Tel.: +39 (0) 544 976156
> > >> Mobile: +39 348 3889844
> > >> e-mail: plc@noemalab.org
> > >> web: http://capucci.org
> > >> skype: plcapucci
> > >>
> > >> _______________________________________________
> > >> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
> > >> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
> > >> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
> > >>
> > >> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
> > >>
> > >> SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In
> the
> > >> page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
> > >> password in the fields found further down the page.
> > >> HOW TO UNSUBSCRIBE: on the info page, scroll all the way down and
> enter
> > >> your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click
> on
> > >> the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
> > >> TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set
> > Digest
> > >> Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
> > >> If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
> > >> http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
> > > _______________________________________________
> > > Yasmin_discussions mailing list
> > > Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
> > > http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
> > >
> > > Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
> > >
> > > SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In
> the
> > page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
> > password in the fields found further down the page.
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> > your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on
> > the unsubscribe button on the page that will appear ("options page").
> > > TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set
> > Digest Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
> > > If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
> > http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Yasmin_discussions mailing list
> > Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
> > http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
> >
> > Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
> >
> > SBSCRIBE: click on the link to the list you wish to subscribe to. In the
> > page that will appear ("info page"), enter e-mail address, name, and
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> > your e-mail address in the last field. Enter password if asked. Click on
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> > TO ENABLE / DISABLE DIGEST MODE: in the options page, find the "Set
> Digest
> > Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
> > If you prefer to read the posts on a blog go to
> > http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
> >
> _______________________________________________
> Yasmin_discussions mailing list
> Yasmin_discussions@estia.media.uoa.gr
> http://estia.media.uoa.gr/mailman/listinfo/yasmin_discussions
>
> Yasmin URL: http://www.media.uoa.gr/yasmin
>
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> Mode" option and set it to either on or off.
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> http://yasminlist.blogspot.com/
>
_______________________________________________
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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] Time for a Substantive Debate on the Language of Art-Science

Dear Yaminers
Dear Ken

thank you very much for this articulated response, which brings up some
fundamental issues

there is really one major issue I have with it, which is this:

> This kind of narrative seems to assume that nothing useful happens in
laboratories.

I have said no such thing. I do not believe such a thing. And, opposite to
this, when I refer to the notion of "bringing science out of laboratories"
I refer to the possibility to bring the results of science out there, in
the world.

Because, if I strongly agree with you about the fact that some scientists,
researchers, institutions and programs establish wonderful, meaningful,
responsible relationships with the "out there", this is not true in
general. And not even for the majority of the cases. In effect, it is true
of a strict minority of subjects.

My eventual agreements or oppositions to the whole rest of your insightful
message derive from this.

You seem to express a logic of exclusion: "it's either this or that"

I am expressing one of inclusion and possibility: "it can be this and that"

I do not desire to express a notion of supremacy of either art or sciences
(or of any other thing, as a matter of fact) over the other. I desire to
open up a discussion of possibility to combining different languages and
modalities.

Different languages and modalities which have different purposes, scopes,
objectives.

There are multiple logics and dynamics according to which behavioral
changes can happen, in small and wide contexts.

Some happen because people become more informed and achieve knowledge and,
thus, they change their behavior.

Some happen because something emotional or aesthetic happens to them and,
thus, they change their behavior.

Take smoking, for example. There are people who stop smoking because they
read "smoking kills you" on the pack of cigarettes. And there are people
who stop smoking because, at a point of their life, start feeling sick,
have a heart or lung problem of some kind, and, in fear, when they sit in
front of someone that tells them "either you stop smoking or it will kill
you", they change their behavior.

The informational content of both situations is at least comparable: words,
images, sensations (I stopped smoking myself, and when I stopped I realized
that even the body contained full information about the need to stop, even
before I stopped: I had a persistent continuous cough for more than 15
years, I had random, repeated pain in the chest, lungs, back, poor
circulation...).
Yet the two modalities act on a completely different level, and achieve
completely different results. Both are needed. The more dramatic, emotional
one is better to confront with "emergencies" and needs for drastic,
participatory, collaborative action.

it is not really difficult to demonstrate how the majority of people, when
brought to making choices, behave in completely irrational ways. There's a
wide literature demonstrating the fact that knowledge of facts does not
necessarily change people's behavior.

A different approach is necessary.

This does not say anything against the necessity of science, its importance
and role in society and in the opportunities it opens in confronting with
the (many) problems of our world. On the contrary, this understanding
supports science in better achieving its goals.

But this kind of combined action needs to be, precisely, a combined action.

If I don't absolutely aim at artists steering the scientific process, at
the same time I don't appreciate at all the notion of art as a decoration
of scientific processes. This should be a peer-to-peer relationship, not
one of subordination in any direction. Which does not mean that everyone
should do everything.

When I opened up my "brain cancer" to create La Cura, I was not aiming at
finding the cures of magicians and wizards. I had a surgery which used an
evolved technique derived from adapting a method used for epilepsy, for
example, engaging and coordinating multiple researchers and producing a
series of publications, and stimulating further research.

La Cura was a wider process. Which is exactly taking science out of the
lab, in the sense I highlighted above: using artistic processes, the ones
of participatory performance, to transform a condition of separation into a
condition of global collaboration and participation. In which the fact that
scientists and farmers, and designers, and citizens, and artists and
children and grandparents work together, each with their own role and
capacities, is not only possible and real, it becomes an expression of
people's *desire*, which is a very, very powerful thing.

In this sense: when science goes out of the lab, wonderful, meaningful
things happen, because not only "people stop smoking", but they also
immediately position themselves in a position in which they are more open
to bringing down their barriers towards diversity, and engaging in open
discussions about what is possible and feasible.

For all of this

If we expect scientists to engage with artists in a serious and responsible
> way, artists must credit scientists with some level of serious engagement
> in the world.
>

I hope to have answered your doubt: such a thing exists in what I wrote
only if that's what you want to read (or if my english is particularly
poor, which is also a possibility)


> Where are these robots to come from? Can we assume that the post-modern
> language of "transgression" is going to solve our problems, whatever they
> are?
>

these and other objections seem to use the same "either-or" logic which I
do not use, favoring "and-and" instead.


>
> There are ways beyond this, but they do not involve roasting fish under
> umbrellas as though we can dredge them up from today's overfished oceans to
> sell them in a transcendental souk


Well, this depends on the governance, the architectures of power, the
technologies you use to make and consume energy, the education system, the
socially constructed possibility to establish meaningful relations and,
most of all, people's imagination in which today, to say the least, the
idea of the possibility to establish meaningful relationships is being
completely pushed out of perception


> where everyone is rich and no one needs to bargain.
>

:) I think you might have read the wrong message here


> But the problem is serious, in the sense that there is no deep political
> will to solve these kinds of problem.


another indication for the need for different approaches, which focus on
*desire*


> A few years ago, Jørgen Randers undertook a study for the Norwegian
> government. He proposed a series of actionable measures to reduce
> catastrophic climate change. The idea was that if every nation in the world
> undertook similar measures, we could dramatically reduce the threat of
> catastrophic climate change within two decades. Randers and the Norwegian
> government understood that Norway alone could not do this. However, they
> reasoned that if Norway adopted these measures, then the other Nordic
> nations might follow – Sweden, Finland, Iceland, and Denmark. If the other
> Nordic nations adopted these measures, then the rest of the European Union
> might follow. And so on.
> The plan involved 15 actionable points. The plan would have raised taxes
> in Norway by about €250 (GBP 191) per year for two decades. The measures
> were put forward in a public referendum. The voters rejected the plan. If
> one of the world's wealthiest and most environmentally conscious nations
> refuses to adopt such measures, it is hard to see what will bring about the
> changes we need in other nations.
>

see above: it is questionable that the knowledge of facts, in itself, is
sufficient to achieve change in behavior. Necessary, but not sufficient.
Addressing the logic of *desire* and *aesthetics*, instead is evidently
more efficient in this (paradoxically, it suffices to think about the brain
areas which it stimulates to see just how much this is true), and also
facilitates shifting to contexts more open to possibility and opportunity,
facilitating education, cultural transformation etc, possibly over longer
terms supported by changes in attitude.
If this type of proposition does not seem as an actionable strategy, I
don't know what is.


> This post-modern Mediterranean world of lively kids dashing among the
> endless stands and kiosks of a market filled with elderly people — all
> well-to-do — and cheerful families does not exist, and cannot.
>

And, in fact, that's nowhere close to what I described. And I think that
you should reconsider your position if these are the mis-readings that you
have to refer to to make your point.

And, about the possibility for existence of different economies: I have one
right next to my house in Rome, in the market of Piazza San Giovanni di
Dio. I write extensively about it in our book "La Cura" from Codice
Edizioni (it is in Italian, but if you want we can talk about it). And a
number of other examples exist.

I would think that denying a living possibility/opportunity is much more a
waste of time than trying to understand how to implement it, how to think
about different ideas for "replicability" and "scalability", how to make
them better using technologies for economics, energy, waste etcetera. And,
in this sense, the Mediterranean offers wonderful examples.


> To put it another way:
> Our political enemies are all wrong on science because they are evil
> people.
> Our friends should challenge science because their hearts are in the right
> place.
>
>
Fine about the citation, but I don't see how any of this fits what I said.
Sorry. I suggest you re-read what I wrote without any preconceptions (and,
possibly, by also framing it into the context of my practice)


> If we are going to be serious about art-science, we've got to think deeply
> about the kinds of discourse we see as useful.
>

If we are going to be serious about art-science we've got to think deeply
about the kinds of things which change people's behavior.


> I do not think that getting scientists out of laboratories is useful. And
> it is not useful to get us all into the endless bazaar where we consume
> increasingly more of everything linked by increasingly dense trade routes
> with more shipping, more transport, more robots, more electronics, more
> fishing and more …
>

By now, I hope you understood that that is not at all what I intended.


>
> We expect scientists to offer responsible and substantive evidence for
> their claims. I expect the same of artist-scientists.
>

hope to have contributed in this direction

all the best!
Salvatore


--
*[**MUTATION**]* *Art is Open Source *- http://www.artisopensource.net
*[**CITIES**]* *Human Ecosystems Relazioni* - http://he-r.i
<http://human-ecosystems.com/>t
*[**NEAR FUTURE DESIGN**]* *Nefula Ltd* - http://www.nefula.com
*[**RIGHTS**]* *Ubiquitous Commons *- http://www.ubiquitouscommons.org
---
Professor of Near Future and Transmedia Design at ISIA Design Florence:
http://www.isiadesign.fi.it/

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Sunday, May 21, 2017

Re: [Yasmin_discussions] art*science 2017 - The New and History

Katerina,

certainly, the concept of innovation is the religion of today's economy.
Economy is a tricky game. When faced with red numbers and limited resources
– we tricked ourselves into borrowing from the future. We promised
unprecedented abundance to repay our debts sometime later and for the
equations of economy to hold, we must eventually deliver something,
something "else," something "new." Of course the game is too complex to
just stop it. But perhaps there are other tricks to get us out of trouble.
What you propose is very interesting and very close to what I had in mind
when mentioning interdependency between heritage and innovation. As you
cleverly noticed it is renovation of ideas rather than innovation that
technological progress provides. The question is thus: can bringing the
terms innovation and heritage closer together do the trick?

As goes with innovation, culture is just as over-used and abused term, and
a dangerous game to play on top of playing economy. A well-established
cultural heritage of one people, for instance, includes the rules of
control and domination over another people that managed to overshadow,
overtake and erase cultural heritage of others. Is human intelligence
mature enough to face the "cultural issues" or should we ask artificial
intelligence? Again, as you noticed, we cannot simply switch on the button
of impartiality. The "raw data" is hard to excavate but perhaps the
abundance of "big data" might do the trick approximately. Do we have
another choice?

Živa Ljubec


On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 4:40 PM, Katreina Karoussos <kkaroussos@gmail.com>
wrote:

> Ziva,
>
> Impartial digital neural sets is actually an excellent way of dealing with
> cultural assets.
> In this manner we are taking culture as an animated organism. To be
> animated though we shall look at its appetite, that is, the primary force
> of its dynamics. In any other case, i think that the neural sets will still
> behave in the common hierarchical organizational structure.
> I don't think that we should take it as "raw data" because the appetite is
> something inherent to us and all of the data are available to us evenly,
> the important thing is what we are choosing to project.
>
> Katerina Karoussos
>
> > On 18 May 2017, at 23:05, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > Katerina,
> >
> >
> > indeed, a critical stance towards historical and geographical approaches
> to
> > cultural heritage is always valuable. Both tangible and intangible
> heritage
> > has been, as you point out, processed in different ways for different
> > political and economic motives and no mode of preservation and
> presentation
> > of the heritage can be taken for granted. Precisely for this reason I
> think
> > a hypothetical discussion of moving from unavoidably prejudiced human
> > neural nets to hypothetically impartial digital neural nets might be in
> > place. With almost unlimited computational resources, what would
> computers
> > make out of it all? To what degree can we restrain the human bias is, as
> > you have noticed, an important issue to consider. Even defining the area
> > can be troublesome, let alone the artefacts. The naturally given concept
> of
> > Mediterranean rim, the shores of the basin filled with Mediterranean sea,
> > might start changing with changes in the global climate – which
> coordinates
> > are included and which excluded? Cultural concepts as well go naturally
> > with their context and converting them into a digital form does not
> > encompass the complete picture in "high definition." If we were to feed
> the
> > model with the "raw" data – what would constitute "raw" at this very
> > moment? The heritage that was already digitized and uploaded from all
> > possible sources or the analogue data from carefully selected
> institutional
> > sources? Running the model for a week, a month, a year, …, its data set
> > constantly increasing, its neurons ceaselessly forming new connections,
> > would it provide us with clues that we could relate to or with
> alternative
> > views, alien viewpoints of culture we considered familiar.
> >
> >
> > Ziva Ljubec
> >
> > On Tue, May 16, 2017 at 5:40 PM, Pier Luigi Capucci <plc@noemalab.org>
> > wrote:
> >
> >> Dear all,
> >>
> >> among the Yasmin invited respondents to the art*science Leonardo 50
> >> discussion there is also Elena Giulia Rossi. Many thanks to Elena Giulia
> >> for joining us!
> >>
> >> Elena Giulia Rossi - rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com <mailto:
> >> rossi.elenagiulia@gmail.com> (Italy)
> >> Elena Giulia Rossi lives and works in Rome. Her research and experience
> >> have been addressing contemporary art and its relation with technology.
> >> Oscillating between tradition and modernity, and under a
> >> socio-anthropological perspective. With a degree in History of Art from
> the
> >> University of Roma La Sapienza (1999), she gained a MA in Arts
> >> Administration from The School of The Art Institute of Chicago (2002).
> She
> >> has been collaborating with different galleries and institutions in
> Italy
> >> and abroad, such as the MAXXI Museum (Rome, 2003-2012), P.S.1
> Contemporary
> >> Art Center (New York 2001); The Renaissance Society at The University of
> >> Chicago (2002); the Joan Flasch Artists' Book Collection at The School
> of
> >> The Art Institute of Chicago (2002), and Studio Stefania Miscetti (Rome
> >> 2004-2005). She has been writing regularly for catalogues and magazines.
> >> She is the author of Archeonet (Lalli: Siena, 2003), and the editor of
> >> Eduardo Kac: Move 36 (Filigranes Éditions: Paris, 2005). She currently
> >> teaches Net Art and Theory of Multimedia Art at the Accademia di Belle
> Arti
> >> in Rome and she is founder and editorial director of the
> multidisciplinary
> >> platform Arshake (www.arshake).
> >>
> >> Thank you in advance,
> >>
> >> Pier Luigi
> >> --
> >> Pier Luigi Capucci
> >> via Rovigo, 8
> >> 48016 Milano Marittima (RA)
> >> ITALY
> >> Tel.: +39 (0) 544 976156
> >> Mobile: +39 348 3889844
> >> e-mail: plc@noemalab.org
> >> web: http://capucci.org
> >> skype: plcapucci
> >>
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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] art*science 2017 - The New and History

I agree with what you have just written Elif. The destruction of heritage, however it occurs and for whatever reasons, and whether we are speaking about works of art or whole cities, towns, villages or languages, poetry, myths, music and dance, whatever makes for a people's culture, leads to gradual impoverishment or if sudden an immediate erasure of identity. This destruction is as old as the existence of human culture. Raising awareness of this ongoing tragic erosion may help to find ways to avoid it.

I looked at Murat Germen's website and found it very interesting. I would suggest also looking at my designer and photographer Richard Wilding's website <http://www.richardwilding.com/> Richard is possibly approaching this in the opposite way. He is carefully documenting the heritage of a number of Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia, Iraq, Syria, photographing remote villages before they are destroyed and the traditional dress and ways of living of their inhabitants. I do not recommend resisting the flow of change but there must be ways of directing it so that we do not lose the richness and variety of the many cultures still possibly only just surviving on our planet.

Liliane Lijn

Liliane Lijn

07770350633
02088095636
www.lilianelijn.com <http://www.lilianelijn.com/>
> On 20 May 2017, at 21:17, Elif Ayiter <ayiter@sabanciuniv.edu> wrote:
>
> I agree with Katerina. Every last word she uttered actually...
>
> What I am concerned about instead is how heritage (which appears to me to
> be a very complex term actually, certainly one that goes beyond mere
> cultural artifacts) is being ruthlessly destroyed.
>
> Which is not to say that I am a preservationist - for example I do not
> advocate that cities should be preserved like museum pieces or be made to
> look like historic remnants. If places change, that for me is actually a
> sign that they are still alive, that they are works in progress. And in any
> case, I doubt that up until quite recently there was any kind of urge to
> preserve cities (or places) as loci of cultural heritage. How would Baron
> Haussmann have been able to operate if that had been the case only 150
> years ago? So, I cannot help but think that our obsession today with
> cultural heritage may signify the end of something - perhaps of a
> civilization: Once you can no longer look forward you start looking back?
> Just a question...
>
> That said, there seems to me a trend toward mindless destruction
> (particularly where the environment is concerned) that I think could be
> discussed; especially within the context of how new media/social media is
> contributing quite a bit to raising awareness to this destruction. In an
> art and computation class that I co-teach with two colleagues, one of whom
> is a computer scientist, every year; we have been noticing how our students
> are increasingly focusing on creating apps and projects that revolve around
> an awareness for environmental destruction. There is one promising project
> in the class this year that visualizes the way in which our city here,
> Istanbul, is being ruthlessly rebuilt into a city of high rises. It has not
> yet been completed but I will be happy to send the link in a few weeks once
> it is. And actually, the other colleague with whom I co-teach the class is
> artist Murat Germen who is highly active in documenting destruction - be it
> cities or ecologies:
> http://muratgermen.com/artworks/erasing-memory-shanghai-istanbul-bellegi-silmek/
>
> elif
>
> On Sat, May 20, 2017 at 6:20 PM, Katreina Karoussos <kkaroussos@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>> Between Salvatore and Ziva,
>>
>> The technology of the paintings in Minoan era, let's say, haven't had the
>> purpose of innovation which is a term that has been established in recent
>> years in order to recycle the methods and tools of the past. I am saying
>> so, because throughout the modern history there hasn't been a eureka
>> moment, as many claim. It was just a redefinition of the past. Thinking
>> about immersive environments: There are plenty of them ascribed to cultural
>> heritage ( caves, theaters, churches etc). To use other tools and
>> technology, doesn't seem to be an innovative dislocation. It is a way of
>> transfer from one era to another.
>> So, i wonder why to renovate something that doesn't need renovation, since
>> this process is unknown to the larger part of the cultural asset? Do we
>> really need to be innovative or we are forced in some way to behave like
>> this not because of our technology but because of our economy?
>> Maybe is better to protect our technology from our economy.
>>
>> Katerina Karoussos
>>
>>
>>> On 20 May 2017, at 08:50, Ziva Ljubec <ziva.ljubec@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> Salvatore,
>>>
>>>
>>> as I understand, your main question in your picturesque account is:
>>>
>>>
>>> *"What directions, methods and tools can we use to propose the
>>> Mediterranean versions of "innovation", "impact" and "value" and, at the
>>> same time, bring up those new sensibilities which are needed to make it
>>> perceivable, comprehensible and adoptable?" *
>>>
>>>
>>> Your immediate answer that follows captivates my imagination:
>>>
>>>
>>> *"Going beyond current approaches towards arts and science collaborations
>>> and promoting art as a platform to get sciences out of laboratories and
>>> into crowded, narrow streets, with smell of spices, kids running lively
>>> with creativity, elderly sitting in chairs outside, transgressive traders
>>> conspiring in whispers, robots carrying some inscrutable package along
>> the
>>> road, shops like holes in walls along the market hyperconnected to
>>> resources around the globe to enact trade, professionals eating under
>>> roasted seafood under umbrella kiosks, served by bots driven by
>> artificial
>>> intelligences, and asking them professional advice and tasks, while they
>>> cook."*
>>>
>>>
>>> When you thicken the plot with transgressive traders your spicy vision of
>>> the future takes me to Neuromancer scenes from Chiba City – only now I'm
>>> supposedly in your "Strait Metropolitan Municipality" and certain
>> parallels
>>> are difficult to imagine. And this difficulty might be a clue to what you
>>> try to define as "*Mediterranean versions of innovation." *Why is sci-fi
>>> narrative so frequently set in Asian and not in Mediterranean narrow
>>> streets? Of course, a lot of it has to do with generalization of
>> cultures.
>>> William Gibson allegedly never visited Chiba City in order to write
>>> Neuromancer, yet we go along with his imagination of the "Asian flavor."
>>> Italian sci-fi set in the "Strait Metropolitan Municipality" might also
>>> appeal to the reader as an all Mediterranean flavor - Italian cuisine is
>>> after all the most popular template for preconception about
>> "Mediterranean
>>> cuisine." Whether written by an insider or an outsider, the account will
>>> always give a partial view. That is why I see necessity for expanding our
>>> view with more than accounts conjured within human neural nets, to
>> uncover
>>> the neglected aspects, to discover new patterns, etc.
>>>
>>>
>>> To return to more preconceptions of Mediterranean vs. Asian version of
>>> innovation: imagine a nostalgic Mediterranean tourist visiting some
>> rapidly
>>> urbanized landscape in Asia, surprised by the scarcity of nostalgia
>> there –
>>> encountering population that was able to progress immensely in incredibly
>>> short period of time, displacing its long lasting traditions like a faint
>>> memory, like a memory on a floppy disc that became useless and
>> incompatible
>>> with the new tech culture overnight. As if lack of nostalgia provides
>>> conditions for progress …
>>>
>>>
>>> The question thus turns into: how can innovation and heritage coexist and
>>> grow out of their interdependency rather than impede each other?
>>>
>>>
>>> Preservation will not suffice, we will need to establish a dialogue with
>>> our creations, consider the viewpoint of art and technology itself –
>>> technology is observing us closely and it seems like soon enough digital
>>> neural networks will know more about us than we do. How do we
>> incorporate,
>>> interbreed the experiences of the heritage of inventions with the
>>> innovations yet to come?
>>>
>>>
>>> Živa Ljubec
>>>
>>> On Thu, May 18, 2017 at 4:26 PM, xDxD.vs.xDxD <xdxd.vs.xdxd@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>>> Dear Yasminers
>>>>
>>>> thank you Pier Luigi, Roger and Nina for having me and Oriana in this
>>>> conversation.
>>>>
>>>> It is very important for us and we hope that it will turn out into new
>>>> ideas for active collaboration involving multiple people on the list.
>>>>
>>>> I'm particularly happy because I feel like I have just emerged from the
>>>> scenario introduced by Pier Luigi in the concept of this conversation.
>>>>
>>>> We have just returned from Messina and Reggio Calabria, from what turned
>>>> out to be a mini-festival for La Cura, the Open Source Cure for Cancer
>>>> which we started in 2012 when I was diagnosed with Brain Cancer: a
>> global,
>>>> participatory performance which used medical data to unveil new
>> possible,
>>>> potential scenarios for disease. Drawing inspiration from Franco
>> Basaglia:
>>>> how can we make the cure an ubiquitous, open, participatory performance?
>>>> This is what we started in 2012, and around 2 millions of people
>> responded,
>>>> hundreds of artworks were produced, millions and millions of messages,
>>>> almost a hundred scientific publications were produced by
>> interdisciplinary
>>>> teams, and thousands of actions. A book came out, and since its
>> publication
>>>> La Cura has become a transdisciplinary education program.
>>>>
>>>> But let's get back to Messina and Reggio Calabria, the "Stretto", the
>>>> Strait.
>>>>
>>>> The Strait is an incredible place: it is a fundamental location in
>>>> mythology, it has had an enormous importance in history, and in the
>> history
>>>> of commerce and trade in the Mediterranean, it is a location of infinite
>>>> marine and coastal biodiversity, it is one of the most convenient
>> places in
>>>> the world in which it is possible to study abyssal fishes and plants, it
>>>> unites the municipalities of Messina and Reggio Calabria, unites the
>>>> continent to the islands, it separates two seas. It hosts misteries,
>>>> legends, crimes, optical phenomena like the Fata Morgana, and more.
>>>>
>>>> It was a fundamental location for Greeks, Romans, Arabs, Spanish,
>> Normans.
>>>> And, recently, for Fascists, Axis, Allies, NATO.
>>>> It is currently one of the sites in which migrants from northern Africa
>> are
>>>> distributed across Italy and abroad.
>>>> Everyone wanted and wants the Strait.
>>>>
>>>> The Strait constitutes the Metropolitan Municipality of Reggio Calabria
>> and
>>>> Messina. Meaning that, as "Strait", the two cities constitute a single
>>>> metropolitan city.
>>>>
>>>> This is clear if you analyze the life of the two cities. The ferry boats
>>>> are like a bridge without the bridge: people go to the university across
>>>> the strait; they cross over for shopping or for an Arancino or Granita;
>> the
>>>> ferries at office times are crowded like a subway (and, for residents
>> and
>>>> students, they cost like a subway). When you did not want to go to
>> school
>>>> and you didn't want to tell your parents, you hopped onto the ferry boat
>>>> and went to the other side, so that you would not be seen, but, still,
>> in
>>>> your city. It is a urban experience which is very rich, peculiar and
>>>> particular.
>>>>
>>>> In this scenario, two different organizations set up an initiative for
>> La
>>>> Cura: Technè Contemporary Art Gallery in Reggio Calabria and COSPECS,
>> the
>>>> Department for Cognitive, Psycological and Pedagogical Sciences of the
>>>> University of Messina.
>>>>
>>>> I don't want, here, to transform this message into an advertisement
>> about
>>>> the events (if you want to know more you are welcome to ask or you can
>> look
>>>> here: http://la-cura.it/2017/05/12/la-cura-sullo-stretto/ , but it's
>> in
>>>> Italian ).
>>>>
>>>> What I wanted to focus on are the modalities in which the whole
>> initiative
>>>> emerged, to highlight why we feel it as significant (in general and for
>> the
>>>> current discussion), and to open up a couple of questions.
>>>>
>>>> First of all: how.
>>>>
>>>> The initiatives originated from relational networks which are anything
>> but
>>>> ordinary. If you were to draw the network which brought to the
>> organization
>>>> of these events you would find journalists, academics, cousins,
>> researcher,
>>>> artists, friends, relatives, activists, psychiatrists, nurses,
>> hospitals,
>>>> etc.
>>>>
>>>> All organized in complex, organic, ecosystemic, emergent organization
>>>> models in which the university is not separated from cities and from
>> their
>>>> communities, clans, families.
>>>>
>>>> If you know something about these cultures, you won't have any problem
>>>> imagining this kind of scenario.
>>>>
>>>> Families, social groups, clans, cities and, in general, relational
>> networks
>>>> and ecosystems are very complex concepts here: both in their traditional
>>>> forms and in their contemporary, technologically driven evolutions.
>>>>
>>>> South Italy's traditional families are numerous, organic, full of a
>> variety
>>>> of branches. If you call someone "cousin", for example, it does not
>>>> necessarily mean that they're your cousin (but, rather, somewhat
>> related to
>>>> your "clan", which can span entire villages, or continents). And they
>> have
>>>> radically evolved through and across technologies, with multiple
>>>> innovations (both technological and organizational) to account for
>> digital
>>>> inclusion (for example of the elderly), welfare, sociality, loneliness,
>>>> separation: a complex mix of email, social networks, whatsapps, and
>> someone
>>>> taking the time to running two blocks in the city to scream from a
>> window
>>>> that someone else's son has written on whatsapp that they arrived safely
>>>> home from the train.
>>>>
>>>> Similar evolutions are seen also by other forms of contemporary family,
>> by
>>>> younger generations in general. Those with exceptional unemployment
>> rates;
>>>> sometimes living at home (in Calabria and Sicily, where it is not
>> unusual
>>>> that the family adds/builds an additional floor on the family home, even
>>>> "illegally", to host the "family" of their sons and daughters, whichever
>>>> its form); most of the times emigrating; sometimes aiming at forms of
>>>> neo-rurality.
>>>>
>>>> And, looking from higher above, all of these relations infiltrate
>> cities,
>>>> making it really complex to define the boundaries of families and clans
>> and
>>>> departments and neighborhoods and so on.
>>>>
>>>> In these scenarios, it is really difficult to be "alone", or isolated.
>> Even
>>>> at the fringes, multiple forms of welfare and connected solidarity exist
>>>> which are unthinkable in other, even apparently more advanced, cities;
>>>> which are beyond social services and, rather, refer to different
>>>> understandings of social living.
>>>>
>>>> Which is, of course, a very interesting scenario for La Cura: one in
>> which
>>>> caring, and inclusion, and presence is not something which is the
>> object of
>>>> consumption – something which you purchase or have "administratively"
>> (like
>>>> social services) or economically –, but, rather, a sort of emergent,
>>>> participatory performance which has, on the one hand, a character of
>>>> creative chaos (and, thus, resilience), while, on the other hand, a
>>>> character of sweetness, irony and organic beauty which one has no
>> problem
>>>> in recognizing as art, theater, performance.
>>>>
>>>> The events which constituted this mini festival ("La Cura sullo
>> Stretto"),
>>>> thus, were organized in this completely relational way.
>>>>
>>>> The results were amazing. Not only a whole gallery and an entire
>> university
>>>> department were dedicated to the events, but they collected the
>> energies,
>>>> intelligences and resources of multiple intellectuals, activists,
>>>> researchers, professionals, artists, across disciplines and approaches.
>>>>
>>>> But there's more. This joyful chaos that I described also had the
>> effect of
>>>> eliminating barriers between gallery, university and city. Grandmothers,
>>>> children, passers-by, and relatives which were summoned by other
>> relatives,
>>>> people from other cities, different departments joined in workshops and
>>>> discussions, comments from students and citizens alike. It was like a
>>>> market, an open air fair in the city, in which serious discussion at the
>>>> level of excellence in science and theoretical approaches (for example
>> the
>>>> COSPECS department at the Uni of Messina is one of the most meaningful
>>>> voices in Cognitive Sciences in Italy, and they engaged theBioethics
>> Dept,
>>>> which also hosts some among the principal membrs of the Bioethics
>> Committee
>>>> in Italy, and the Departments of Arts, Psychology, Psychiatry, and more)
>>>> were intertwined with the life of the city, with elderly who had a
>> chance
>>>> not only to be in company byt also to explore how technologies and
>> networks
>>>> could contribute to avoiding loneliness and separation, with ordinary
>>>> citizens, students and more.
>>>>
>>>> For us (and for the University, the Gallery and everyone involved) it
>> was
>>>> an incredible experience, in which scientific excellence, beauty, tears
>> of
>>>> commotion, workshops, food, granitas, and civic action all came
>> together to
>>>> create an experience which was transformative for multiple people.
>>>>
>>>> All facilitated and catalyzed by art, design and creativity.
>>>>
>>>> All activated through the beautiful, noisy, live relations that are
>> typical
>>>> of the cultures on this side of the mediterranean, methodologically.
>>>>
>>>> There would be millions of other things to say about this.
>>>>
>>>> What I would like to focus on is the model. That is: what kind of
>>>> innovation and development model this would correspond to.
>>>>
>>>> Because, it must be said, the ways in which innovation and development
>> are
>>>> measured in "standard" ways (the ones which are useful for obtaining EU
>>>> grants, for example, or with Ministries or Banking Foundations to obtain
>>>> funds) would be able to capture only a minimal part of the impacts and
>>>> effects which an action such as this one brings to the ecosystem of the
>>>> Strait.
>>>>
>>>> A quantitative analysis and, even more, the localized (spatially and
>>>> temporally) quantitative analysis which is the standard to construct the
>>>> indicators which are necessary to detail if you want to access, say,
>>>> Horizon2020 or other funding opportunities, would be able to capture and
>>>> represent only a minimal part of the impacts brought on by an happening
>>>> such as this one.
>>>>
>>>> Furthermore, these indicators correspond to a very precise conceptual
>> model
>>>> for the definition of "impacts" and "effects".
>>>>
>>>> Instead, from what I described above, indicators which are networked,
>>>> emotional, relational, generative (meaning: observing the capacity to
>>>> generate X) would be needed.
>>>>
>>>> And, thus, a different definition of "impact" and "value" would be
>> needed,
>>>> as well.
>>>>
>>>> In more than one way, the Mediterranean is and has been a model for
>> these
>>>> kinds of definitions. Always a crossroad for trade, migrations, art and
>>>> war, it is a sort of internet before the internet: a network of
>> networks,
>>>> creating a condition of ante-literam hyperconnectivity. The
>> Mediterranean
>>>> as a hypertext: Ulysses comes back transformed only after having
>> travelled,
>>>> surfed, link after link.
>>>>
>>>> And, as recognized by Giampaolo Fabris in his Societing, by Cova, Carù
>> and
>>>> Dalli with their Mediterranean Marketing, and by Giordano and Arvidsson
>>>> with the update and partial reset they have brought to both concept
>> through
>>>> Netnography, these times are particularly fit for enactment of new
>> models
>>>> of this kind. The epoch of transition; knowledge as main productive
>> factor;
>>>> postmodernity as economy of postindustry; new social, semiotic,
>>>> antropologic value of consumism; new social aggregation around
>> consumption;
>>>> shift from transition to relation; user as partner and committent;
>> death of
>>>> mass marketing; social dimensions of marketing; from marketing to
>>>> societing. These characteristics which Fabris points out, are then used
>> by
>>>> Cova, Giordano and Arvidsson to frame a new dimension of markets and,
>> thus,
>>>> of value and of the processes which are needed to construct it.
>>>>
>>>> This is evident in Matvejević's "Breviario", where the names of objects
>> and
>>>> things transform from interaction to interaction, across the
>> Mediterranean
>>>> sea. In the book "the mediterranean is not only a geography. Its
>> boundaries
>>>> are not defined neitherin space nor in tim. We don't know how to
>> determine
>>>> them, and in what way: they are incapable of being reduced to sovranity
>> or
>>>> history, they are not state nor nation. […] Europe was conceived on the
>>>> Mediterranean." The word "Mediterranean" itself is a transdisciplinary
>>>> travel in history and across ports, lighthoues, cultures, religions and
>>>> arts, resisting and adapting through languages and jargons, and
>> resisting
>>>> to encounters and wars.
>>>>
>>>> Going back to the event where I started this narration, and on the value
>>>> which it might represent, and on the methods and tools needed to
>> "measure"
>>>> (in lack of a better word) its impacts and effects, to communicate
>> them, to
>>>> make them more accessible and, in the mantime, to
>> describe-by-performance
>>>> new types of innovation: more gentle, inclusive, desiring, cooperative,
>>>> aiming at coexistence, not consensus.
>>>>
>>>> This is a great, important question in our practice, every day: what
>>>> directions, methods and tools can we use to propose the mediterranean
>>>> versions of "innovation", "impact" and "value" and, at the same time,
>> bring
>>>> up those new sensibilities which are needed to make it perceivable,
>>>> comprehensible and adoptable?
>>>>
>>>> A sincere alliance between arts, sciences and technologies would seem a
>>>> great, positive solution to this kind of question. Going beyond current
>>>> approaches towards arts and science collaborations and promoting art as
>> a
>>>> platform to get sciences out of laboratories and into crowded, narrow
>>>> streets, with smell of spices, kids running lively with creativity,
>> elderly
>>>> sitting in chairs outside, transgressive traders conspiring in whispers,
>>>> robots carrying some inscrutable package along the road, shops like
>> holes
>>>> in walls along the market hyperconnected to resources around the globe
>> to
>>>> enact trade, professionals eating under roasted seafood under umbrella
>>>> kiosks, served by bots driven by artificial intelligences, and asking
>> them
>>>> professional advice and tasks, while they cook.
>>>>
>>>> When describing the Third Generation City, Marco Casagrande says that it
>>>>
>>>> "is the industrial city ruined by the people – human nature as part of
>>>> nature.
>>>> Like a weed creeping into an air-conditioning machine the industrial
>> city
>>>> will be ruined by rumors and by stories. The common subconscious will
>>>> surface to the street level and architecture will start constructing for
>>>> the stories – for the urban narrative. This will be soft, organic and
>> as an
>>>> open source based media, the copyrights will be violated. The author
>> will
>>>> no longer be an architect or an urban planner, but somehow a bigger
>> mind of
>>>> people. In this sense the architects will be like design shamans merely
>>>> interpreting what the bigger nature of the shared mind is transmitting."
>>>>
>>>> When Gilles Clement talks about the Third Landscape, about the moving
>>>> gardens, the gardens without a form, he does not point in the direction
>> of
>>>> the disappearance of the gardner. Rather he talks about a new form of
>>>> gardner, one who does not use rake and shovel as tools, but, rather,
>> "wind
>>>> and knowledge".
>>>>
>>>> In both cases, a new sensibility is needed. To recognize value where
>> now,
>>>> in our present condition, we do not see it.
>>>>
>>>> Clement and Casagrande openly speak about a new education of the gaze,
>> and
>>>> of the need for a new sensibility.
>>>>
>>>> As does Gregory Bateson, when he describes the need for new aesthetics:
>>>> sensibility to a beauty to that which interconnects.
>>>>
>>>> After all: "it takes two to know one."
>>>>
>>>> Salvatore
>>>> ᐧ
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Re: [Yasmin_discussions] art-science discussion

Hi everyone!

and, starting from Roberta and Katerina:

I have been thinking about cultural heritage as a problematic term. I
> completely agree with her. we can think of cultural heritage as a mummified
> item, but we can also think of it as something dynamic, constantly
> changing, crisscrossed by all sorts of odd, subtle and definitely
> oppressive relations of power, and definitely multilayered.
> She is right when she mentions the implication of cultural heritage and
> the political.
> However, I also have other items in mind. for instance, how do we define
> cultural heritage? what stands for it? and who gets to call it cultural
> heritage?
> very briefly: when I think of cultural heritage, I don't necessarily think
> of big monuments and landmarks. by themselves, those are, to say it
> bluntly, pieces of stone. what makes them monuments though is the fact that
> there is an entire city living in their proximity, and a bunch of people
> assigning significance to them. this significance can be historical,
> geographical, but also very personal. [...]


I could not agree more!
And this direction is very linked to the other one which we were embracing
on the topic, related with transgression, desire and imagination (public,
private, intimate, etc).

For example, aiming at creating platforms for dealing with these
"transgressive" versions of Cutural Heritage, when we created the Real Time
Museum of the City in Sao Paulo, capturing the myriads of micro-histories
of the city through massive social network data capturing processes, we
also created an Emotional Compass.

If you want to know more you can read a short discussion here:
https://www.academia.edu/32442426/Visualising_Emotional_Landmarks_in_Cities
(and more documentation is available on this book:
http://www.springer.com/it/book/9783319434025 and we'll put more online
soon)

The objective of the Emotional Compass was to be able to recognize
*Emotional Landmarks* in cities.

These can be described as those locations in which, for different
socio-cultural groups, at certain specific times, conditions and contexts,
a certain pattern of emotional expression takes place systematically.

For example, an office building, on friday late afternoon, may be the
emotional landmark associated to extreme happiness for all the office
employees. But, at the same time, could be a boring, hated place by the
ones who do the cleaning, as they would be only starting their work while
everyone is having fun.

In longer version of the study, for example in the book, we investigate how
understanding these and other "different" types of landmarks can bring to
interesting, useful new definitions of Landmarks and of Cultural Heritage,
which are networked, emotional, relational, ecosystemic, and which can be
used performatively, to generate new liveliness and civic imagination.

For example, this is what we do when we say that we do Digital Urban
Acupuncture (DUA): understand the flows and densities of data, information,
knowledge and communication to gain understandings of the city which are
similar to the ones which an acupuncturer would have, and then turning
these understandings and insights open source, so that a variety of
different actors (including citizens, artists, desgners, researchers,
policy makers, kids, elderly..) can use them to design and enact their
performance of the city.


> I will be visiting Athens in the next few weeks (talking about political
> and economic forces ...after all the polemics, I will be checking out
> Documenta) and Venice (mmmmm…Biennale, and the big boats in the luna, and
> the environmental threat coming from the sea etc…) and I bet lots can be
> said about these two places alone.
>

exactly. from a DUA point of view, for example, these large events would
take a completely different form, as they would be made by first setting up
ways to observe a relational ecosystem (for example, in case of Documenta,
of the city, of its artists, of the artists which traverse it or the topics
that matter for it; or as in the case for Milan's Expo: teh relational
ecosystem of agriculture operators, for example), understand its models,
variations, differences, dynamics, and then implementing a series of
interventions in which all stakeholders appropriate this knowledge to
perform the city, to transform it.
The institution becomes a platform for imagination, expression and
performance.

--
*[**MUTATION**]* *Art is Open Source *- http://www.artisopensource.net
*[**CITIES**]* *Human Ecosystems Relazioni* - http://he-r.i
<http://human-ecosystems.com/>t
*[**NEAR FUTURE DESIGN**]* *Nefula Ltd* - http://www.nefula.com
*[**RIGHTS**]* *Ubiquitous Commons *- http://www.ubiquitouscommons.org
---
Professor of Near Future and Transmedia Design at ISIA Design Florence:
http://www.isiadesign.fi.it/

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